USA 11 Best Road Trips

There are lots of amazing things to do across the United Stated for anyone looking to have exciting experiences. You can explore the cliffs overlooking the Pacific while driving with your windows down. Alternatively, you can embark on a border to border journey exploring the astonishing North-South road trip routes. These are all possibilities. Let’s share some of these wonderful destinations with you so you can have an insight into the incredible moments awaiting you if you finally decided to go on the North-South road trips.

1. The Pacific Coast Route

The Pacific coast route
The Pacific coast route

A trip along the Pacific Coast Route will give you a lot of exciting moments. The journey begins from the northwest tip of the United States at Washington’s Olympic National Park, kept you within sight of the ocean all the way south to sunny San Diego. The road totaling about 1,650-mile with mostly two-lane will give a view of the temperate rainforest up to the near-desert areas.
The highlights of the Pacific Coast Route include Olympic National Park (WA), Three Capes Loop (OR), and Redwood National Park (CA).

2. The Border to Border Road Trip

The Border to Border Road Trip
The Border to Border Road Trip

Another amazing trip is the border to border route, which starts from the north and takes you across the Canadian border at Jasper National Park, and then, traverses through some of the wildest and most rugged landscape you can ever imagine. These include the mighty mountains, the glaciated valleys, the raging rivers, and the two very different deserts, among other amazing places.
The places of interest along the Border to Border Route include the Columbia Icefield (AB), Bitterroot Mountains (MT), The Extraterrestrial Highway (NV), and Joshua Forest Parkway (AZ).

3. The Road to Nowhere US-83 Road Trip

US-83 Road Trip
US-83 Road Trip

This used to be the only paved route from Canada to “Old Mexico.” The US-83 route cuts across America’s heartland and remains a must-seen tourist destination.
Things to look out for on the Road to Nowhere include the Sitting Bull Memorial (SD), Nebraska Sand Hills (NE), Monument Rocks (KS), and Paint Rock Pictographs (TX), among other wonderful places.

4. The Great River Road Trip

The Great River Road Trip
The Great River Road Trip

Often referred to as the Old Man River, Father of Waters, or Big Muddy by admirers, the mighty Mississippi River, cuts a mythic figure across the American landscape.
Some of the highlights of the Great River Road are: Main Street USA (WI), St. Louis (MO), Natchez Trace Parkway (MS), and New Orleans (LA).

5. The Appalachian Trail

The Appalachian Trail route
The Appalachian Trail route

The Appalachian Trail route is a place to be. The trip starts from the top of New England and takes you through a bunch of natural beauties to arrive at the heart of Dixie.
Notable tourist attractions along the Appalachian Trail include the Mt. Washington (NH), The Poconos (PA), Shenandoah National Park (VA), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NC), among other epic places.

6. The Atlantic Coast Road Trip

The Atlantic Coast Road Trip
The Atlantic Coast Road Trip

This is a 2,000 miles road trip that starts right from the Statue of Liberty to end at the free-wheeling Key West. Tourists travel within sight view of the Atlantic Ocean.
Some of the notable things you would like to see on this route include the Statue of Liberty (NJ), Assateague Island National Seashore (MD), Savannah (GA), as well as the Cocoa Beach (FL).

7. The Great Northern US-2 Road Trip

The Great Northern US-2 Road Trip
The Great Northern US-2 Road Trip

The route was named the Great Northern to denote the memory of the pioneer railroad, which runs alongside the western half of the route. A trip via US-2 route will definitely remain in your mind for a very long time.
If you travel along the Great Northern route, the following attractions will certainly catch your attention. These are the Tumwater Canyon (WA), Glacier National Park (MT), Lake Michigan (MI), and Acadia National Park (ME).

8. The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail
The Oregon Trail

A road trip on the Oregon Trail takes you to the glorious sea and sand of Cape Cod. It’s like going on a pilgrimage.
Some of its highlights include: Cannon Beach (OR), Fort Boise (ID), Yellowstone National Park (WY), and Mt Rushmore & Carhenge (NE).

9. The Loneliest Road

The Loneliest Road
The Loneliest Road

The Loneliest Road takes you on a 3,200-mile journey through the heart of America. The trip cut across a dozen different states including four state capitals and the nation’s capital, Washington, D.C.
Some of the attractions along the Loneliest Road include the South Lake Tahoe (CA), Moab (UT), The Million Dollar Highway (CO), and Dodge City (KS), among others.

10. The Historic Route 66 Road Trip

The Historic Route 66 Road Trip
The Historic Route 66 Road Trip

Route 66 is one of the famous destinations in the United States. It showcases a lot of American heritages, making it one of the most captivating routes for people around the world. If you go on Route 66, sure, you won’t miss the great displays of neon signs, rusty middle-of-nowhere truck stops, or kitschy Americana.
Places of interest along Route 66 include the Chicago (IL), Meramec Caverns (MO), Tucumcari (NM), Painted Desert (AZ), and Santa Monica (CA).

11. The Southern Pacific US-80 Road Trip

The Southern Pacific US-80 Road Trip
The Southern Pacific US-80 Road Trip

A trip on the Southern Pacific promises amazing experiences for you. It gives you the opportunity to experience a variety of cultural and physical landscapes far in excess of what any other cross-country route can offer. You will travel via the deserts to bayou swamps and Tex-Mex to barbecue. It’s a trip filled with amazing experiences!
Some of the highlights on the Southern Pacific route are the Desert View Tower (CA), Tombstone (AZ), Roswell (TX), and the Civil Rights Movement National Historic Trail (AL), among other places.

How To Stay Away From Road Rage & Live A Safe And Happy Life

Statistics have shown that in North America, approximately half of the drivers on the road will experience some form of road rage. This includes people who will unexpectedly lose their tempers, allowing their emotions to get out of control and those that will be victims of someone else’s anger. Our roads have become so overcrowded that it’s no wonder anyone can keep their sanity! So, during negative times, how do we deal with road rage when it pops its ugly head up?

Dealing With Road Rage:

Studies have shown that the majority of people who have become angry while on the road never expected the situation would escalate out of control. Over 85% believed they would have seen it coming and bitten their tongues before losing their tempers.

As the recipient of road rage, you might truly believe you did nothing wrong but then get swept up in the moment when someone else unloads on you. It’s only common sense that taking the high road is the better alternative by placing your ego on the back burner. If you are confronted by someone who is well out of control and is displaying signs of violence, you should get out of the situation as quickly as possible in order to protect yourself from possible physical harm.

It’s really easy to become embroiled in a confrontation when someone, who is out of control, starts insulting you or even takes a swipe at you. Unfortunately, when you push back you are putting yourself in harm’s way when stepping back from the situation is a much smarter choice. Too many people have ended up in ER or even worse, the morgue because they let their tempers take control. On the other hand, if you are the party that struck out at someone else, you could end up in a court of law and spend time in jail.

How To Steer Clear Of Angry Or Violent Drivers:

People who are dealing with something that just happened in their lives are not thinking rationally and are easily stirred to anger. They start taking their situation out on everyone else that is within arm’s reach. Road rage does not consist of 2 people that know each other, you have no idea how they will react. You don’t know if this person has just become unhinged or are always prone to anger so don’t put yourself in a bad situation.

Whether someone cuts you off or blows their horn at you, be the bigger person and apologize even if you are in the right. Maybe they blew their horn because they didn’t feel you were driving fast enough for them. So what! Simply signal “I’m sorry” or let them cut in front of you. The idea is to cool down the situation and continue on your way. Avoid eye contact and never take it personally, because quite frankly it’s not.

If a driver continues to harass you, drive to the nearest police station or look for a police car in the vicinity. Head to an area that is traversed by a lot of people in order to get others to help you out, should this person continue to come after you. Let’s face it, everyone has a cell phone so someone could call the police when this person continues to pursue you. If possible, get their license plate and report them as soon as you can.

How To Avoid Becoming Angry Yourself:

Avoid situations that could easily set you off. If you are heading to an appointment, give yourself enough time to get there. Don’t blame someone else for causing you to be late, you didn’t give yourself adequate time. Listen to your radio and keep a positive attitude when driving alone. Do Not Drink And Drive! Drivers that have been drinking have a tendency to become angry very easily and it’s against the law to drink and drive! There are many scenarios that can reduce rational behavior so know what your limits are and take steps to make sure you don’t fall into a fit of anger.

Stay away from the notion that you (and you alone) can change someone else’s bad behavior. Understand, if some guy cuts you off and almost drives you off the road, you don’t know this person nor how they will react if you push back. Maybe they just lost their job or their wife wants a divorce! It really doesn’t matter, what matters is keeping yourself safe and living to see another day. Road rage is never worth the price tag when your family and friends expect you to return home and you don’t.

In A Nutshell:

We all have to face the fact there are many dangerous people out there and are willing and able to harm others. You can’t change what’s going on in their lives, all you can do is make sure you don’t become a part of their messed up situation. When you get tempted to “fling the bird” or shout some derogatory comment, think about your newly adopted puppy who wants you to come home!

Best Road Playlist – Kevin Devine

 

On June 1st 2002 I had the chance to interview New York singer/songwriter Kevin Devine, who is also the frontman of the Miracle of 86 after his set at The Royal Albert.

YATD:: First off, what do you see as the message, or theme of your music?

Kevin Devine: I don’t know that there’s a singular message, I guess I just write a lot about what’s happening to me. I think there’s a lot of bullshit and “faking it” in emo music, and I don’t want to do that. I just write about whatever’s going on.

YATD: How do you feel you express yourself differently solo, compared to when playing with the Miracle of 86?

KD: The line is kind of blurred, a lot of songs went from the band to me, and vice versa. To me, the stuff I do by myself doesn’t need the drums and the loudness, and maybe it’s a little different lyrically, and more country-ish in style. The band is a little more rock and roll, and this is a little more not.

YATD: Did you find the transition from playing with the group, to playing solo difficult to make?

KD: You always play solo first, cause you play in your room that way (and in front of your friends or whoever). I started playing solo in college out of necessity, because I really wasn’t around the band as much. It’s more nerve-racking because if you fuck up, you fuck up. But I also find it a little more liberating, because you don’t have to be jumping around screaming. It’s more like how you’re playing when you’re sitting around in your house.

YATD: Your music has been compared to the work of Bright Eyes, and the early Dashboard Confessional songs. How do you feel about these comparisons?

KD: I’m a lot more excited to be compared to Bright Eyes than to Dashboard Confessional. Not because he’s big, but I’ve just never liked his music, even before he was big. I respect him because he’s worked hard forever, but on the other hand, in terms of pure songwriting, Conor Oberst is infinitely better. Chris Carraba is 28 year old man writing about 15 year old emotions. Conor Oberst and David Bazan (Pedro The Lion) are so much more complex in their writing. In terms of being compared to Bright Eyes, I like him a lot, but when he misses, he misses almost to the point of being embarrassing. But when he’s on, he’s as good as anybody is. I just get nervous when I’m compared to someone like him, because he’s so easily identifiable it’s almost like you’re ripping him off. But it’s also an honor to be compared to him.

YATD: Chris Carraba chose the moniker Dashboard Confessional to separate his songs from himself, and make them something anyone can relate to and sing along to. Are your songs outpourings of your individual feelings, or do you think that many people can relate to the lyrics as descriptions of how they may be feeling?

KD: Everyone in the world can relate to happiness, or sadness regardless of their age, whether they’re 10 or 40. Kids will relate to what they’re going to relate to. I’m not on the level of popularity as someone as Chris Carraba or Conor Oberst, but I don’t really think about that because it’s not my job to think about it. It’s up to you guys if you want to relate to it or not. Certain songs I’m surprised that people can relate to, especially some newer songs, because they have very personal lyrical content, and if people relate to them I don’t know how they do. Some songs are about specific incidents in my life, and it’s hard to get an outside perspective on them, but I think kids are going to relate to whatever. It’s more about how you present it, than anything else. It’s up to you guys.

YATD: What type of crowd do you feel your music attracts? Is this different than the makeup of Miracle of 86 fans, and if so, how?

KD: I think a lot of this is shared, but for instance my mom likes this better than the Miracle of 86. I think a person who doesn’t like standing at a rock show and having their hair blown back or whatever will be more comfortable listening to me solo. There are a lot of kids now that aren’t as excited about drum rock and roll. I think in terms of lyrical tastes, there isn’t much difference between and Elliott Smith fan and a Pavement fan.

YATD: What artists have you been listening to lately?

KD: I have a copy of the new Bright Eyes full length, and I’ve been listening to that a lot. A lot of Pedro the Lion, my friends listen to a lot of hip hop. Right now, our friend Mike has been playing us stuff like The Casket Lottery and Transistor Sound and Lighting Co.

YATD: What albums always stay in your playlist?

KD: Definitely Nirvana – Nevermind, In Utero, and basically all of Nirvana’s catalogue. Both Elliott Smith records, Guns N Roses – Appetite for Destruction, Crooked Rain by Pavement, and Pedro The Lion’s “It’s Hard To Find A Friend”.

YATD: Which show that you’ve played do you remember as being the most fun?

KD: On this tour, Kenora was probably the most fun because there was like nobody there, so I did like 15 songs including Tenacious D covers. Before that, the night before I left we (Miracle of 86) opened for The Promise Ring, and there were like 800 kids there, so it was crazy. Hanging out with them was really awesome, and having Davey (van Bohlen) telling us our band was great, while we are huge fans of them was really cool. Also, pretty much everyone was there so it was really fun. That show is going to stand out to me for a long time.

YATD: Of any band or artist, current or broken up, who would you most want to tour with?

KD: Nirvana for sure. The Beatles were the best band ever and that’s just how it is, but Nirvana is the only band in my lifetime that I couldn’t take my eyes off of. They changed the way I looked at music when I was 12. More realistically, someone like Elliott Smith or Pedro the Lion.

YATD: You’ve played four sets in the past two days. On air, at a community centre, at a coffee shop and at a bar. Which type of venue do you enjoy playing most? Which do you feel suits your music best?

KD: I think tonight (the Royal Albert) was my favorite show to play. I’ve never been a fan of coffee shop shows because people always expect it to be quiet, boring lifeless poetry and I don’t want to be any of those things. It was cool, but I love playing in bars. I also loved playing in Altona. I just think it’s all about the crowd, if the crowd is into it you could be playing in your bedroom. It’s kind of 50/50. You do what you do, but if the crowd needs to get into it too for it to be good.

YATD: What does the future hold for Kevin Devine?

KD: The band is recording a full length for release in the fall on Immigrant Sun Records. I have song coming out on a compilation in England, and I’m also probably going to record a solo full length before the year is over.

YATD: Lastly, why would one call you a protest singer?

KD: It’s from a lyric in The Smith’s song Shakespeare’s Sister, “I thought that if you had an acoustic guitar then it meant that you were a protest singer”, and I just used the lyric for a flyer for one of my first solo shows. Then when I thought about it, I realized it was true. Before Dashboard Confessional and all that, everyone associated a guy with an acoustic guitar as being a folk protest singer.